septembre 17, 2014


asylum-art:

Everyday Objects With Faces Are Awesome

When you walk around and look at everything around you, chances are, you may see a face. It may be human, it may be an animal, but sometimes you can see faces in inanimate objects. This is called Pareidolia: Seeing faces in random things!

(via sevdolo)

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repeat from Asylum Art

mutantcaveman:

gotham evening post 

lines by mark dos santos

colors by sdowner

(via fumettidccomics)

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repeat from mutantcaveman
blackrainbowparis:

On vous donne rdv samedi pour notre Friends & Family BBQ Party !! Lieu secret jusqu’au dernier moment. A partir de 13h, accès gratuit mais UNIQUEMENT sur invitation. Des DJ’s, à boire et à manger, le tout entre nous. Plus d’infos sur notre page Facebook “BlackRainbow Paris”. #blackrainbow #paris #friendsandfamily #bbq #party (visuel by @mpywashere )

blackrainbowparis:

On vous donne rdv samedi pour notre Friends & Family BBQ Party !! Lieu secret jusqu’au dernier moment. A partir de 13h, accès gratuit mais UNIQUEMENT sur invitation. Des DJ’s, à boire et à manger, le tout entre nous. Plus d’infos sur notre page Facebook “BlackRainbow Paris”. #blackrainbow #paris #friendsandfamily #bbq #party (visuel by @mpywashere )

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repeat from Blackrainbow Paris

septembre 16, 2014


(Source : , via thegreenteacrimewavestudio)

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repeat from MakingStarWars

septembre 15, 2014


carlboygenius:

BETTY BOOP - The Original Story

Ms. Esther Jones, known by her stage name, “Baby Esther,” was an African-American singer and entertainer of the late 1920s. She performed regularly at the (The Cotton Club) in Harlem.


Ms. Jones singing style went on to become the inspiration for Max Fleischer cartoon character’s voice and singing style of “Betty Boop”.

YES: “Betty Boop” was a black woman. 

Singer Helen Kane saw her act in 1928 and copied it, stole it. Ms. Jones’ “trademark” singing style for a recording of, “I Wanna Be Loved By You.” with interpolated words such as ‘Boo-Boo-Boo’ & ‘Doo-Doo-Doo’ in her songs at a cabaret was a style all her own. 

An early test sound film was also discovered, which featured Baby Esther performing in this style, disproving Kane’s claims. During the $250,000 infringement lawsuit, Esther’s manager testified that , “Helen Kane & her manager saw Baby’s act somewhere between 1928-1929.Baby Esther’s manager also testified that Helen Kane had saw Baby Esther’s cabaret act in 1928.” 

Supreme Court Judge Edward J. McGoldrick ruled: “The plaintiff has failed to sustain either cause of action by proof of sufficient probative force”. In his opinion, the “baby” technique of singing did not originate with Kane.

As an added note, scholar Robert G.O’Meally said, Betty Boop, the WHITE CARTOON character herself had, as it were, a BLACK grandmother in her background. 

Baby Esther was presumed dead by 1934, just when the lawsuit had ended.

(via tashahrosa)

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repeat from One Life Observed

vanstyles:

Naturally lit with Madzilla

(via triv1904)

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repeat from Official Tumblr of Van Styles
tashahrosa:

cindimayweathersson:

poeticrican:

I hope yall realize these people grew up and had kids who could very well be your friends parents or grandparents. Just let that sink in.

^^^This is why whenever people try and say we live in a post racial society I roll my eyes.

precisely 

tashahrosa:

cindimayweathersson:

poeticrican:

I hope yall realize these people grew up and had kids who could very well be your friends parents or grandparents. Just let that sink in.

^^^
This is why whenever people try and say we live in a post racial society I roll my eyes.

precisely 

(Source : coutois)

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repeat from Coutois
princesswhatevr:

whitepeoplestealingculture:

humansofcolor:

nativefaces:

CULTURAL GENOCIDE:  Before and After photo of a young Cree boy, forced to attend a Canadian “Indian school.” (1910)

Despicable.

I want to show this to white people who say that cultural appropriation isn’t a big deal because you’re taking a part of someone’s culture that was insulted, attacked and taken away from them for years and years and now you want to wear it as some sort of costume or fashion trend. But your ancestors were the ones to forcefully take away and obliterate OUR cultures for centuries. We STILL aren’t allowed to freely embrace our cultures because white people love to insult us and make fun of us, but white people themselves love wearing it because they think their mayo asses are entitlted to everything. Nope fuck off. 

Fuck

princesswhatevr:

whitepeoplestealingculture:

humansofcolor:

nativefaces:

CULTURAL GENOCIDE:  Before and After photo of a young Cree boy, forced to attend a Canadian “Indian school.” (1910)

Despicable.

I want to show this to white people who say that cultural appropriation isn’t a big deal because you’re taking a part of someone’s culture that was insulted, attacked and taken away from them for years and years and now you want to wear it as some sort of costume or fashion trend. But your ancestors were the ones to forcefully take away and obliterate OUR cultures for centuries. We STILL aren’t allowed to freely embrace our cultures because white people love to insult us and make fun of us, but white people themselves love wearing it because they think their mayo asses are entitlted to everything. Nope fuck off. 

Fuck

(via tashahrosa)

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repeat from Native Faces

septembre 11, 2014


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repeat from Comics, Comics Everywhere!
artcomesfirst:

Doghound

artcomesfirst:

Doghound

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repeat from Art Comes First: Inspirations

septembre 9, 2014


denyscowan:

Green Arrow: Secret Origins # 4

Denys Cowan 

pencils

Bill Sienkiewicz

inks

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repeat from Denys Cowan
alexhchung:

Prince by Brian Bolland.
The interior story is by Dwayne McDuffie & Denys Cowan.
This might be the coolest comic I own.

alexhchung:

Prince by Brian Bolland.

The interior story is by Dwayne McDuffie & Denys Cowan.

This might be the coolest comic I own.

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repeat from Alex Chung
infinity-comics:

Black Panther Corner BoxBlack Panther Vol. 2 #4 (October 1988)By Denys Cowan

infinity-comics:

Black Panther Corner Box
Black Panther Vol. 2 #4 (October 1988)
By Denys Cowan

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repeat from Infinity Comics
peacepax:

Yovanna

peacepax:

Yovanna

250 notes
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repeat from PeacePax
anonymousatheist420:

And now you know…
The real “Lone Ranger,” it turns out, was an African American man named Bass Reeves, who the legend was based upon. Perhaps not surprisingly, many aspects of his life were written out of the story, including his ethnicity. The basics remained the same: a lawman hunting bad guys, accompanied by a Native American, riding on a white horse, and with a silver trademark.Historians of the American West have also, until recently, ignored the fact that this man was African American, a free black man who headed West to find himself less subject to the racist structure of the established Eastern and Southern states.While historians have largely overlooked Reeves, there have been a few notable works on him. Vaunda Michaux Nelson’s book, Bad News for Outlaws: The Remarkable Life of Bass Reeves, Deputy U.S. Marshal, won the 2010 Coretta Scott King Award for best author. Arthur Burton released an overview of the man’s life a few years ago. Black Gun, Silver Star: The Life and Legend of Frontier Marshal Bass Reeves recounts that Reeves was born into a life of slavery in 1838. His slave-keeper brought him along as another personal servant when he went off to fight with the Confederate Army, during the Civil War.Reeves took the chaos that ensued during the war to escape for freedom, after beating his “master” within an inch of his life, or according to some sources, to death. Perhaps the most intruiging thing about this escape was that Reeves only beat his enslaver after the latter lost sorely at a game of cards with Reeves and attacked him.After successfully defending himself from this attack, he knew that there was no way he would be allowed to live if he stuck around.Reeves fled to the then Indian Territory of today’s Oklahoma and lived harmoniously among the Seminole and Creek Nations of Native American Indians.After the Civil War finally concluded, he married and eventually fathered ten children, making his living as a Deputy U.S. Marshall in Arkansas and the Indian Territory. If this surprises you, it should, as Reeves was the first African American to ever hold such a position.Burton explains that it was at this point that the Lone Ranger story comes in to play. Reeves was described as a “master of disguises”. He used these disguises to track down wanted criminals, even adopting similar ways of dressing and mannerisms to meet and fit in with the fugitives, in order to identify them.Reeves kept and gave out silver coins as a personal trademark of sorts, just like the Lone Ranger’s silver bullets. Of course, the recent Disney adaptation of the Lone Ranger devised a clever and meaningful explanation for the silver bullets in the classic tales. For the new Lone Ranger, the purposes was to not wantonly expend ammunition and in so doing devalue human life. But in the original series, there was never an explanation given, as this was simply something originally adapted from Reeves’ personal life and trademarking of himself. For Reeves, it had a very different meaning, he would give out the valuable coins to ingratiate himself to the people wherever he found himself working, collecting bounties. In this way, a visit from the real “Lone Ranger” meant only good fortune for the town: a criminal off the street and perhaps a lucky silver coin.Like the Lone Ranger, Reeves was also expert crack shot with a gun. According to legend, shooting competitions had an informal ban on allowing him to enter. Like the Lone Ranger, Reeves rode a white horse throughout almost all of his career, at one point riding a light grey one as well.Like the famed Lone Ranger legend Reeves had his own close friend like Tonto. Reeves’ companion was a Native American posse man and tracker who he often rode with, when he was out capturing bad guys. In all, there were close to 3000 of such criminals they apprehended, making them a legendary duo in many regions.The final proof that this legend of Bass Reeves directly inspired into the story of the Lone Ranger can be found in the fact that a large number of those criminals were sent to federal prison in Detroit. The Lone Ranger radio show originated and was broadcast to the public in 1933 on WXYZ in Detroit where the legend of Reeves was famous only two years earlier.Of course, WXYZ and the later TV and movie adaptions weren’t about to make the Lone Ranger an African American who began his career by beating a slave-keeper to death. But now you know. Spread the word and let people know the real legend of the Lone Ranger.
Via https://plus.google.com/b/113376504911684406239/109950959928032580820

anonymousatheist420:

And now you know…


The real “Lone Ranger,” it turns out, was an African American man named Bass Reeves, who the legend was based upon. Perhaps not surprisingly, many aspects of his life were written out of the story, including his ethnicity. The basics remained the same: a lawman hunting bad guys, accompanied by a Native American, riding on a white horse, and with a silver trademark.

Historians of the American West have also, until recently, ignored the fact that this man was African American, a free black man who headed West to find himself less subject to the racist structure of the established Eastern and Southern states.

While historians have largely overlooked Reeves, there have been a few notable works on him. Vaunda Michaux Nelson’s book, Bad News for Outlaws: The Remarkable Life of Bass Reeves, Deputy U.S. Marshal, won the 2010 Coretta Scott King Award for best author. Arthur Burton released an overview of the man’s life a few years ago. Black Gun, Silver Star: The Life and Legend of Frontier Marshal Bass Reeves recounts that Reeves was born into a life of slavery in 1838. His slave-keeper brought him along as another personal servant when he went off to fight with the Confederate Army, during the Civil War.

Reeves took the chaos that ensued during the war to escape for freedom, after beating his “master” within an inch of his life, or according to some sources, to death. Perhaps the most intruiging thing about this escape was that Reeves only beat his enslaver after the latter lost sorely at a game of cards with Reeves and attacked him.

After successfully defending himself from this attack, he knew that there was no way he would be allowed to live if he stuck around.

Reeves fled to the then Indian Territory of today’s Oklahoma and lived harmoniously among the Seminole and Creek Nations of Native American Indians.

After the Civil War finally concluded, he married and eventually fathered ten children, making his living as a Deputy U.S. Marshall in Arkansas and the Indian Territory. If this surprises you, it should, as Reeves was the first African American to ever hold such a position.

Burton explains that it was at this point that the Lone Ranger story comes in to play. Reeves was described as a “master of disguises”. He used these disguises to track down wanted criminals, even adopting similar ways of dressing and mannerisms to meet and fit in with the fugitives, in order to identify them.

Reeves kept and gave out silver coins as a personal trademark of sorts, just like the Lone Ranger’s silver bullets. Of course, the recent Disney adaptation of the Lone Ranger devised a clever and meaningful explanation for the silver bullets in the classic tales. For the new Lone Ranger, the purposes was to not wantonly expend ammunition and in so doing devalue human life. But in the original series, there was never an explanation given, as this was simply something originally adapted from Reeves’ personal life and trademarking of himself. For Reeves, it had a very different meaning, he would give out the valuable coins to ingratiate himself to the people wherever he found himself working, collecting bounties. In this way, a visit from the real “Lone Ranger” meant only good fortune for the town: a criminal off the street and perhaps a lucky silver coin.

Like the Lone Ranger, Reeves was also expert crack shot with a gun. According to legend, shooting competitions had an informal ban on allowing him to enter. Like the Lone Ranger, Reeves rode a white horse throughout almost all of his career, at one point riding a light grey one as well.

Like the famed Lone Ranger legend Reeves had his own close friend like Tonto. Reeves’ companion was a Native American posse man and tracker who he often rode with, when he was out capturing bad guys. In all, there were close to 3000 of such criminals they apprehended, making them a legendary duo in many regions.

The final proof that this legend of Bass Reeves directly inspired into the story of the Lone Ranger can be found in the fact that a large number of those criminals were sent to federal prison in Detroit. The Lone Ranger radio show originated and was broadcast to the public in 1933 on WXYZ in Detroit where the legend of Reeves was famous only two years earlier.

Of course, WXYZ and the later TV and movie adaptions weren’t about to make the Lone Ranger an African American who began his career by beating a slave-keeper to death. But now you know. Spread the word and let people know the real legend of the Lone Ranger.

Via https://plus.google.com/b/113376504911684406239/109950959928032580820

(via sevdolo)

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repeat from Mr. Doe's Your Religion Is Fucked Up